Large Scale Glass Sheet Packaging – Best Practices, Packaging Material and Expert Tips

Are you posed with a challenge of shipping large scale glass sheet and making sure that it reaches the addressee in one piece? We thought of giving you a snapshot of the whole process, things to look out for in the packaging materials and tips to ensure successful packaging and transport.

 

For packaging and transporting a glass sheet of large size say 2250MM X 3210MM

X 6MM (Length X Width X Thickness), you will need to use Aluminum Barrier Foil Laminate, Cardboard, Superdry Silica Gel, Wooden Box, Steel Strap and Seal.

 

For packaging the glass, first set the Aluminum foil on the Auto Packer according to the size of the glass panel and position the glass in auto packer appropriately. Put up the glass edge protection. Wrap up the glass with foil and seal it to create vacuum inside the packing.  Complete the packaging by putting up the glass in wooden end cap. Note that adequate quantity/dosage of Desiccant packets should be added before packaging in Aluminum Barrier Foil Laminate

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The Aluminum Foil is the main packaging material needed in this. Make sure that the foil offers following:

  • Offers exceptional strength, high flexibility, heat-sealability and water vapour resistance
  • Maintains humidity level below 40 RH inside the package
  • Gives excellent protection against Oxygen transmission, physical damage, biological damage, odour transfer, Ultra Violet radiations, chemical breakdown, Oils and Greases, Acids and Alkalies
  • Restricts propagation of crack thru the laminate .

Tips for safe packaging:

  • Make sure that there are no cuts in the Aluminum Barrier Foil Laminate. The vacuum generation can create issues as the packing will not get properly squeezed.
  • Make sure that you fix the Cardboard properly using the Bopp tape on glass edge.
  • Ensure that you choose a packaging supplier which can provide you wide sheets of 3-4 meters in length.
  • Look out for the filling of the joints in the wide width wrappers – there should not be any gaps in that.

 

In case you are looking for expert advice on packaging, connect with our packaging experts!

Style And Substance – The Crepe Paper Story

Nobody seems to be quite certain how long crepe paper has been around but most of us recognize this material in the decorative streamers that grace our special occasions.  Those of us in the packaging game set great store by the protective qualities of the material too. Given the importance of this material it’s time we dedicate a post to it.

Some basic information first – crepe paper is tissue paper that is created by adding glue to the paper pulp and then creasing it as it dries on the heating cylinder. The paper has a distinct texture and special qualities due to the method of manufacture. The degree of the creasing is impacted by the quality of the paper pulp, the nature of the adhesive and also the speed and physical characteristics of the cylinder and blade of the machine. One way to classify the paper is by the amount it gets shortened due to the creping – anywhere between 10 – 30% is possible.

For starters it is among the lightest papers going. The creasing also means that it is extremely flexible, very soft, highly stretchable with great tensile strength and quite water absorbent. The paper is also inexpensive, clean and environmentally friendly due to its non-toxic nature. These qualities make it ideal for several specific packaging situations like the wrapping of long or complex shaped objects.

There are different types of crepe paper suited for specific packaging applications. For eg.

Electrical Grade Insulating Crepe Paper – This paper is used as insulation in the manufacture of several types of IMB, CT, CVT transformers and oil immersed transformers and also for making leads and shields. The life of the transformer is directly influenced by the insulating quality of the crepe paper used. The insulating properties of this grade of paper also make it suitable for using in insulating cables.

Seed Germination Grade Crepe Paper – This paper is used as a media mimicking soil for the testing of the quality of seeds in the lab. The water absorbent property and the structure of the paper makes it ideally suited for this application as it offers protection to the roots of the seeds while they are very delicate.

Color Tissue Crepe Paper – Crepe paper can be made in a variety of bright and pleasant colors. Given their flexibility and better appearance they find common use as decorative materials like streamers and the like.

Special grades of Crepe paper are also excellent for:

  • Aluminum profile packing – the cushioning effect and the conformability to contoured shapes of the paper makes it an ideal choice here preventing scratches during storage and transport.
  • Fragile good packaging – The softness and cushioning effect the paper provides makes this suitable for the packing of fragile materials.
  • Bag stitching applications – Fabric laminated paper bags for powdered material packaging require leak proof stitching areas – Crepe paper pieces inserted during stitching hold the thread firmly at stitching area and forms leak proof areas.

The industry is constantly evolving to find ever greater uses for this versatile material. We know of Filament Reinforced Crepe Paper and also different form factors like Flexible Crepe Paper tubes. What we do know is the material is as useful as it is pleasant looking – a perfect blend of form & function actually!

Sustainable Packaging – 7 Key Characteristics

The world population is increasing every day and earth has only finite number of resources in terms of land, water and air. It is important that efforts are taken to reduce pollution, waste and we conserve the natural resources and energy.

 

We at Safepack have made a public commitment of integrating sustainable development into our business model. Safepack has received the World Star Packaging Award 2013 for its compostable packaging material called Safecompost, which is a bio-polymer coated paper/board.

 

Based on our research of over many years, here we present 7 key characteristics of sustainable packaging:

 

  1. Packaging should be compostable and recyclable
  2. It should be made from renewable/ recycled resources
  3. The biopolymers used in packaging should be based on raw materials that come from natural crops or from fossil sources, or combinations of these
  4. The material should be easily compostable in nature if disposed in open and should not accumulate as a waste
  5. The carbon footprint i.e. Co2 and methane emissions should be within moderate limits. It should also be low emitter of greenhouse gases
  6. It should offer highest quality of protection against humidity, oxygen and grease barriers and sealability
  7. While designing the packaging, a life cycle assessment focusing on consumption and emission factors should be done. This should be done right from the initial design till end of life.

 

Globally, sustainability has become an important aspect for consumers. They are now expecting the companies to be Green. In advanced economies such as North America and Western Europe, consumers’ purchase decisions are driven a lot by environmental concerns. According to a recent survey by Tetra Pak, globally, consumers are more and more on the lookout for sustainably packaged products and almost 54% of consumers trust eco labels.

 

It is high time that brand owners, especially in the food industry, need to start looking at environment-friendly, sustainable packaging options.

How Packaging Manufacturers Should Engage With Distributors

Industrial Performance Group, an Illinois based firm that specializes is supply chain and distribution channel management, conducted a study of 750 manufacturers and 500 distributors. Shockingly, the study revealed that 82% of manufacturers and 92% of distributors feel that the problems in the working relationships are negatively impacting their sales performance and profitability.

 

Distributors are the link between end customer and the manufacturer. They act as the sales force for the manufacturers. There is always an increasing debate on whether manufacturers should treat their distributors as employees or customers. Based on our experience of over decades with national as well as international distributors, we feel that the relationship is not of an employee or customer – it is of a true, trusted partner.

 

In the Packaging Industry, we feel that the partnership goes even deeper. Here, the Distributors cannot be just the local suppliers of goods and materials. The distributors require knowledge and expertise in multiple areas – On one hand, they need knowledge of local market, marketing strategies and deep understanding of local business whereas; on the other hand, they need to have expertise in the packaging products, the technology and ability to exactly understand customer needs.

 

We at Safepack believe in having a true partnership with our distributors. So we work with a unique co-branding initiative. Under this initiative, we co-brand all our products with the distributor’s brand name. This is the testament of our faith and commitment towards our distributors.

 

We also closely work with our distributors to educate them about the products and technology. With the strong understanding of the technology, they feel more empowered to assist the customers in a true sense rather than just selling the products based on customers’ budgets. They are able to accurately understand the customers’ needs and propose products based on that.

 

We believe that in a successful partnership, both sides strive for each other’s success and help each other in every possible way for a combined success.

 

Connect with us if you wish to be a part of Safepack Distribution partnership.

How Packaging Manufacturers Should Engage With Distributors

Industrial Performance Group, an Illinois based firm that specializes is supply chain and distribution channel management, conducted a study of 750 manufacturers and 500 distributors. Shockingly, the study revealed that 82% of manufacturers and 92% of distributors feel that the problems in the working relationships are negatively impacting their sales performance and profitability.

 

Distributors are the link between end customer and the manufacturer. They act as the sales force for the manufacturers. There is always an increasing debate on whether manufacturers should treat their distributors as employees or customers. Based on our experience of over decades with national as well as international distributors, we feel that the relationship is not of an employee or customer – it is of a true, trusted partner.

 

In the Packaging Industry, we feel that the partnership goes even deeper. Here, the Distributors cannot be just the local suppliers of goods and materials. The distributors require knowledge and expertise in multiple areas – On one hand, they need knowledge of local market, marketing strategies and deep understanding of local business whereas; on the other hand, they need to have expertise in the packaging products, the technology and ability to exactly understand customer needs.

 

We at Safepack believe in having a true partnership with our distributors. So we work with a unique co-branding initiative. Under this initiative, we co-brand all our products with the distributor’s brand name. This is the testament of our faith and commitment towards our distributors.

 

We also closely work with our distributors to educate them about the products and technology. With the strong understanding of the technology, they feel more empowered to assist the customers in a true sense rather than just selling the products based on customers’ budgets. They are able to accurately understand the customers’ needs and propose products based on that.

 

We believe that in a successful partnership, both sides strive for each other’s success and help each other in every possible way for a combined success.

 

Connect with us if you wish to be a part of Safepack Distribution partnership.

The Past Shows The Way To A Green Future for VCI

Those in the business have probably heard this story but it bears repeating for those that may have come in late and in any case most of us have a role in how it plays out in the days to come.

The story of Volatile Chemical Inhibitors starts during the dark days of the Second World War when the freshly opened lid of a dessicator containing compounds being tested for making gas pipelines corrosion resistant revealed that the chemical compound placed at the bottom had made its way to the very top as it vaporized. A mechanism suggested itself to combine the corrosion inhibiting capabilities of the chemical and its volatile nature in an innovative way to check the corrosion of especially in-transit metals. This sparked a revolution that many of us owe our livelihoods to now – the emergence of VCI.

Given the prevailing times it was perhaps inevitable that the earliest promoters of the technology were the military. The US Navy with its fleet of steel ships exposed to the most corrosive environments was a natural supporter. The feature of greatest value at the time, apart from the ability to stop corrosion in its tracks, was the promise of “dry” protection the technology offered. Just as attractive was the fact that using VCI removed the need for oils, coatings and other temporary protective that were the options available at the time. This meant less material to be stored and moved around in addition to a significant saving in time. On the downside – little attention was paid to the dangers the VCI materials themselves presented – some nasty, carcinogenic compounds like dicyclohexylammonium nitrate made their way into the VCI world posing a clear and present danger to those exposed with them.

With the end of the War the next phase in the evolution of VCI turned the spotlight on making it safer. Newer chemicals with reduced toxicity started appearing as a result of the growing amount of research dollars being spent on making them safer. Toxicity tests also started making their impact felt in deciding the suitability of a material. With continuous development in this area today the materials being used are safer than they have ever been – at-least as far as we know now.

The next step was to focus on finding newer applications for VCI technology including more effective and efficient ways of manufacturing and transforming it to make it suitable for these new applications. Today VCI finds application in not only the marine industry where it originally found acceptance but also in in-transit corrosion inhibition in industries as diverse as metals, automotive, electronics and others.

Over the last few years’ concerns for the environment brought with them more onerous environmental regulations and this has given a fillip to the use of VCI. Given the “dry” process there is no need to wash off and then discharge protective oils or coats. VCI packaging is generally re-usable and the possible use of Vegetable Oils is also a promising area but clearly more needs to be done. The future evolution of VCI has to be motivated by a desire to make VCI chemicals themselves more environmentally friendly. The challenge for us in the business is to identify more innovative solutions that tax the environment less and less. Can we learn from history and make VCI even greener and more responsible?

The Savings Are In The Process

In a previous post we had listed the ways that using VCI Packaging could save money. Among the points we made was that there were significant Labour Cost savings that would accrue at both the shipping end and the receiving end. We had also spoken of the increased productivity of the labour force as a result of the use of VCI. The reaction to the post suggests that more explanation may be required as to exactly how these cost savings and improved productivity comes about.

A.      Process while using traditional protectives:

Slide1

As you can see – the use of traditional protective like Oils, Coats or Films require the application on the bare metal component to be protected before shipping and the removal, cleaning and drying of that before inspection on receipt. In most instances the material has to then go through the same process to be made ready for onward shipment to the exact location where it will be used.

 

B.      Process while using VCI

Slide2

As is apparent – VCI offers a quick and easy way to protect the bare metal part in transit. This also translates into a similarly quick & easy process at the receiving end.

A straight comparison between the two shows how the process while using VCI is significantly shorter with far fewer steps. This has a direct impact on the time taken. Less time necessarily means:

  1. Less labor required to complete the process – at the shipping end as well as the receiving end
  2. The less time required to complete a cycle means that the same amount of labor can undertake more activities – higher productivity in other words.

I hope this helps to drive home the benefits that accrue in terms of time and cost savings due to the use of VCI as against traditional protective’s. What do you think – is there anything more that we should consider that could impact the process flow or the time?

 

6 Ways VCI Packaging Will Save You Money

Worldwide, there has been a tremendous change in the packaging methods being adopted by various industries and more so by Engineering industries. With an estimated loss of around $157Billion every year due to corrosion, industries have become more careful about their packaging methods.

 

Humidity (Above 40%), saline and polluted atmosphere, surface acidity, hand sweat, packaging faults, direct contact with wood, paper products, use of bare polythene, air trapped packaging, corrosive fillers and cushions are among the common causes of corrosion.

 

Temporary Protective’s are packaging methods which offer protection to bare metal during transit and storage. The traditional protectors are oils, strippable coats, surface films, coats, shielding materials, etc. VCIs (Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors) are the new generation protectors that have now matured enough to gain the confidence of the metal industry.

 

While VCI technology is rapidly replacing traditional protection methods there is a common misconception that it is more expensive. Based on our experience of more than 25 years of working on, research and providing customized R&D solutions for anti-corrosion wrappers let us try to set that argument to rest as well. Here are 6 reasons why, when you consider the Total Cost of Ownership (TCO), VCI packaging is in fact more economical than conventional methods

 

  1. Reduced Rejections: The use of VCI packaging has been proven to be more effective at corrosion prevention than conventional methods – thus providing cost savings due to reduced rejections at the receiving end.
  2. Labor: As VCI packaging is a dry method it does not require coating, drying or packing and that considerably reduces the labor costs. Coating and sprays are time consuming but VCIs are quick and easy. The reduced product cycle time increases productivity bringing with it a cost advantage. Multiply these costs at both the supplier and the receiving end and you can get a sense of the total cost savings.
  3. Material: VCIs reduce the usage of preserving oils, greases, varnishes, oil resistant primary packaging and dessicants thus saving significant material costs.
  4. Storage costs: Unlike VCIs, preserving materials are often hazardous or flammable thus requiring special, and consequently more expensive, storage, handling and transportation.
  5. Special Facilities: With VCI packaging you can save the costs associated with the setup and maintenance of dipping, spraying and cleaning facilities that more traditional methods need.
  6. Pollution monitoring: VCIs are clean, dry and environment friendly – thus reducing the cost associated with ensuring compliance with the environmental rules and regulations as compared to protective’s.

 

We hope these points will help substantiate the point about the economic benefits of VCI packaging – if you still need help or have any questions you need answered then please feel free to connect with us. Our experts will definitely have answers!

So Which VCI Packaging Is Better –A Stress Test Will Show

Shakespeare’s famous quote about a rose by any other name smelling just as sweet does not apply to VCI packaging paper – that’s to say that not all VCI packaging is equally effective when it comes to offering protection from corrosion. The problem is how to tell the difference from one paper to the other? Here is a simple test we recommend to our customers faced with a similar dilemma.

Set up needed:

  1. Temperature controlled air circulated oven
  2. 2 Glass Jars of 750 ML capacity each
  3. 1 50 ML Beaker
  4. 2 CRC Plates of size 7.4 X 7 X 0.2 CM with a hole at the top
  5. 0.5 Mtr Nylon Thread
  6. 1” BOPP Adhesive Tape
  7. 500 ML White Spirit
  8. Test Samples of VCI Wrapper / Film of size 10 X 20 CM

Preparing the Test Plates:

  1. Tie a thread into the hole in the test plate
  2. Polish the plate with emery paper to remove all traces of rust
  3. Smoothen the surface of the plate with 800 No. Polish Paper
  4. Boil the plate in white spirit to remove all residue
  5. Remove the plate from the spirit with a pair of forceps and lay it on a poly sheet to cool and dry

How to conduct the Stress Test:

  1. Take the Glass jars and place the VCI wrappers / films to be compared into each jar as indicated in the picture below.
  2. Hang the test plate inside the jars with the help of the thread.
  3. Replace the lids of the jars tightly and keep it at ambient temperature for a minimum of 4 hours. This is called the built-up phase.
  4. After the built-up phase pour 30ML of tap water into each jar using a funnel and replace the lid tightly.
  5. Seal the lids with the BOPP adhesive tape to prevent the escape of water vapour.
  6. Place both the jars into the air circulated oven for 8 hours at a temperature of 60 degrees C.
  7. Remove the jars after 8 hours in the oven and place them at ambient temperature for 16 hours.
  8. The end of 16 hours signifies the end of 1 cycle of the test. At this time open the jars and compare the plates in each jar for corrosion to check the effectiveness of each VCI wrapper / film – the plate that suffers less corrosion is protected by the better quality VCI wrapper / film.
  9. As a guide a VCI wrapper / film that offers good protection should allow the plate to pass through 3 cycles of the test.

You may recognize that the test indicated above is a variant on a standard stress test used to show how using a VCI wrapper / film protects a CRC plate better than an un-protected plate in a similar condition. We feel that with this little twist it would be just as effective to show the relative merits of VCI wrappers / papers that make similar corrosion prevention claims- what do you think?

7 Myths about Corrosion and Corrosion Protection

Wikipedia defines corrosion as “the gradual destruction of metals, by chemical reaction with its environment.” There have been lot of misconceptions or lack of knowledge about corrosion and corrosion protection.

In this article, we try to bust some myths about corrosion and corrosion protection.

1.      Stainless steel is corrosion free

This is a very well-known misconception about stainless steel. In reality, it is an alloy of iron, low levels of carbon, and chromium. Undoubtedly, the chromium in Steel gives it resistance to rust, but it can definitely get stained if it is exposed to corrosive environment such as seawater.

2.      There is no harm in touching finished bare metal with bare hands

Did you know that the human sweat contains salt materials and is acidic in nature? This can cause corrosion. Therefore, using gloves while handling finished metals is good not only from hygiene perspective but is also recommended from corrosion prevention perspective.

3.      Kerosene (also called as MTO)  is rust preventive  

It is a common misconception that kerosene coating can safely be used as rust preventive on metals. In reality, kerosene is rust loosening agent and not a rust preventive agent. Because of its rust loosening quality, one may see rust removal for some time after use of kerosene, but it cannot prevent rust formation.

4.      Wrapping bare parts in plastic is enough for giving corrosion protection

While it is true that plastic is water proof, it cannot protect the metal from moisture because it is not moisture proof. Would you believe that 500 gauge thick plastic allows water vapour transmission of 4gm/sqm/day?

5.      Packaging of metals in wooden boxes is safe

Contrary to the belief that bare metals can be “safe” inside wooden boxes, it must be noted that wood can be highly corrosive because it contains moisture and acidic juices, which can be highly corrosive. Therefore, packaging in wooden boxes without any appropriate protective layer is strictly not recommended. One should also pay special attention to the fact that the protective layer should be able to provide protection throughout the duration of transit.

6.      Used oil is good enough for in-plant corrosion protection

Not at all. One needs to be careful about used oil because it can develop acidity over a period of exposure to the air and contaminants. This can cause corrosion.

Domestic corrosion prevention methods are good enough for exports too

May not be always true. There are various other factors such as transport condition, handling and atmosphere which need to be taken into consideration while exporting the material. The techniques used for packaging for local transits may not suffice for exports where you may need to consider other factors such as seaworthiness of packaging.

 

Would you like to share some other myths which you hear often?